Provincetown History Snippet: Holy Mackerel!

Provincetown History Snippet: Holy Mackerel!

In 1851, there were 60 Provincetown-owned vessels weighing a total of 4,332 tons pursuing mackerel; the fishery employed 688 men and boys. In 1864 the catch was so great, the year was referred to as the Boon Island Year. It didn’t last. By 1871, the price haddropped...
Provincetown History Snippet: The Moors Motel & Restaurant

Provincetown History Snippet: The Moors Motel & Restaurant

Today it’s AWOL, part of the chain of Lark Hotels, but in the 1950s at the end of Bradford Street Extension you’d have found The Moors Motel and The Moors Restaurant. The promotional postcard for the motel noted it was “Provincetown’s nicest, overlooking the beautiful...
Provincetown History Snippet: The Somerset

Provincetown History Snippet: The Somerset

Provincetown was largely deserted during the Revolution, as many of its men enlisted to fight. Yet together with Truro, Provincetown made one of the war’s biggest captures. The 64-gun British man-of-war Somerset had blockaded Boston and bombarded Charlestown during...
Provincetown History Snippet: Early Provincetown Homes

Provincetown History Snippet: Early Provincetown Homes

The earliest homes in Provincetown were reminiscent of the cottages the early settler left behind, yet adapted to life on a sand bar. They were shingled, built close to the ground with small circular cellars that could withstand the pressure of the ever-shifting sand....
Provincetown History Snippet: The Provincetown Airport

Provincetown History Snippet: The Provincetown Airport

Constructed in the 1940s, with a runway first paved in 1948, the Provincetown Municipal Airport consists of developed airside and landside areas maintained for airport facilities and operations, surrounded by undeveloped areas that consist of grasslands, coastal...
Provincetown History Snippet: Dorothy Bradford

Provincetown History Snippet: Dorothy Bradford

Dorothy May Bradford was born in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England, about 1597, the daughter of Henry and Katherine May. At the age of 16, she married 23-year old William Bradford in Amsterdam, and returned with her husband to take up residence in Leiden, Holland. The...
Provincetown History Snippet: John Reed and Louise Bryant

Provincetown History Snippet: John Reed and Louise Bryant

Few people have lived through such earth-changing times; journalist John Reed famously wrote about “ten days that shook the world” in reference to the Russian Revolution, which he and Louise Bryant both observed first-hand; but before that, they were also...
Provincetown History Snippet: Whorf’s Wharf

Provincetown History Snippet: Whorf’s Wharf

The long line of Whorf fishermen and sea captains goes back to John Whorf, born in Provincetown in 1760. Thomas Ryder Whorf Jr, who lived between 1815 and 1887, built the famous 400-foot-long Whorf’s Wharf (apparently no one thought anything of the odd alliteration...
Provincetown History Snippet: The Mudheads

Provincetown History Snippet: The Mudheads

In the late 19th century, summer art colonies were becoming increasingly popular. Charles Hawthorne selected Provincetown as the site for his summer school, and he taught his students to do plein-air paintings—paintings out of doors. A model would sit on a stool on...
Provincetown History Snippet: Useless and Ridiculous

Provincetown History Snippet: Useless and Ridiculous

During the Civil War, two defensive batteries were built on Long Point to protect Provincetown’s valuable harbor from a possible Confederate blockade. The batteries were essential: Provincetown had strategic importance for the war and both the fishing fleet and the...